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Frank-Dieter Grimm:

Central Place Systems in Central and Eastern Europe

Map and English language commentary

Ed.: Österreichisches Ost- und Südosteuropa-Institut Wien

1997. 78 pages, 21x31cm, 300 g
Language: English

(Atlas Ost- und Südosteuropa, Map 5.3-MO1)

ArtNo. ES028051093, paperback, price: 21.00 €

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Contents

Inhaltsverzeichnis top ↑

Preface 3
1. Objectives 4
2. Methods and Area of Research 6
2.1. Basis Aspects of the Registration and Classification of Central
Place Systems 6
2.2. Methodological Outline of the Study 8
2.2.1. Basic Features and Frame of References 8
2.2.2. The Functions and Classification of Central Places 9
2.2.3. The Classification of International Transport Axes 11
2.2.4. The Registration of National Central Place Systems 12
2.3. Outline of the Spatial Structure of Central and Eastern Europe 12
2.3.1. Natural Features 12
2.3.2. Historical Background - Development in the 19th and 20th Centuries 12
2.3.3. The Macro-Regional Classification of Economy and Population in
Present-Day Central and Eastern Europe 13
3. Central Place Systems in Central and Eastern Europe 13
3.1. Classes of Centres 14
3.1.1. Centre Functions 14
3.1.2. The Classes of Central Places: "A" Centres to "E" Centres 15
3.2. Transport Routes and Transport Axes 17
3.2.1. The Routes taken by Individual Forms of Transportation 17
3.2.2. International Transportation Axes l9
3.3. Basic Features of the National Central Place Systems 19
4. Tendencies of Central Place and Spatial Development in Central and
Eastern Europe 20
4.1. The Upheaval in Central and Eastern Europe and its Relevance for
the Central Place and Spatial Development 20
4.2. Contours of Future Central Place and Spatial Development in
Central and Eastern Europe 21

4.2.1. Development of Central Places 21
4.2.2. Transportation and Settlement Axes 24
4.3. Concepts of Central Place and Spatial Development in Central and
Eastern Europe 25
5. The Central Place Systems of Individual States and Regions 27
5.1. National Central Place Systems of the Large States (Russian
Federation, Ukraine) 27
5.1.1. Russian Federation [Rossijskaja Federacijal: Western Periphery 28
5.1.1.1. St.Petersburg [Sankt-Peterburg] and the Leningrad Region
[Leningradskaja oblast'] 28
5.1.1.2. The Pskov Region [Pskovskaja oblast'] 30
5.1.1.3. The Regions of Brjansk, Smolensk and Novgorod [Brjanska,
Smolenskaja, Novgorodskaja oblast'] 31
5.1.1.4. The Kaliningrad Region [Kaliningradskaja oblast'] 31
5.1.2. The Ukraine [Ukrama]: WesternUkraine 33
5.2. National Central Place Systems in Medium-Sized States (Belarus,
Poland, Romania, Czech Republic, Austria and Hungary) 35
5.2.1. Belarus [Belarus'] 36

5.2.2. Poland {Polska] 37
5.2.3. Romania [Romania] 39
5.2.4. The Czech Republic [(eska republika] 41
5.2.5. Austria [Osterreichl 43
5.2.6. Hungary [Magyarorszag1 45
5.3. National Central Place Systems of Small Countries (Estonia,
Lithuania, Moldavia, Slovakia, Slovenia, Croatia) 47
5.3.1. Estonia [Eesti] 47
5.3.2. Latvia [Latvija] 49
5.3.3. Lithuania [Lietuva] 50
5.3.4. Moldavia [Moldova] 52
5.3.5. Slovakia [Slovensko] 53
5.3.6. Slovenia [Slovenija] 55
5.3.7. Croatia [Hrvatska] 56
6. Central Places and Their Development Potentials According to
Countries (Tables) 59
6.1 Russian Federation - Kaliningrad Region [Rossijskaja Federacija -
Kaliningradskaja oblast'] 59
6.2 Western Ukraine [Ukraina] 59
6.3. Belarus [Belarus'] 60
6.4. Poland [Polska] 61
6.5. Romania [Romania] 62
6.6. Czech Republic [(2eska republika] 63
6.7. Austria [Osterreich] 64
6.8. Hungary [Magyarorszag] 65
6.9. Estonia [Eesti] 65
6.10. Latvia [Latvija] 66
6.11. Lithuania [Lietuva] 66
6.12. Moldavia [Moldova] 67
6.13. Slovakia [Slovensko] 67
6.14. Slovenia [Slovenija] 67
6.15. Croatia [Hrvatska] 68
Sources and Literature 69