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László Trunkó:

Geology of Hungary

1996. VIII, 464 pages, 116 figures, 5 tables, 17x25cm, 1200 g
Language: English

(Beiträge zur regionalen Geologie der Erde, Band 23)

ISBN 978-3-443-11023-9, bound, price: 81.00 €

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Keywords

GeologyHungaryBalatontectonicGeologieUngarnPlattenseeTektonik

Contents

Description of content top ↑

Trunkó's work presents a complete, up-to-date overview of the geology, stratigraphy and structure of Hungary. It not only considers the literature up to and including 1995 but also Hungarian publications which were only partly accessible in the West. More than 800 literature references provide a convenient entry point to the specialized literature on the regional geology of Hungary and make this new volume a valuable reference.

Contents top ↑

Contents
1. Preface 1
2. Introduction 4
3. Transdanubian Mid-Mountains 10
3.1 Stratigraphy 10
3.1.1 The Palaeozoic structure along Lakes Balaton and Velence 11
3.1.1.1 The pre-Permian sequence 11
3.1.1.2 The Permian sequence in the Balaton Upland 20
3.1.2 The Mesozoic of the Transdanubian Mid-Mountains 22
3.1.2.1 Triassic sequences 22
3.1.2.2 Jurassic sequences 47
3.1.2.3 Cretaceous sequences 60
3.2 Tectonics of Transdanubicum 75
3.2.1 Bakony Mountain 75
3.2.2 Vértes Mountain 82
3.2.3 Gerecse Mountain 83
3.2.4 Pilis Range and Buda Hills 84
3.2.5 The nappe issue in the Transdanubian Mid-Mountains 87
3.2.6 The role of lateral movements 90
3.2.7 Fault structures along the SE margin of the Mid-Mountains 94
3.2.8 Summary of tectonic events in Transdanubicum 95
4. Igal Unit 97
4.1 Stratigraphy 97
4.2 Tectonics 99
5. Alpine Unit 100
5.1 The Penninic windows 100
5.2 Lower Austroalpine in the Sopron Hills 105
5.3 Graz-type Palaeozoic in the basement of the Little Plain 108
5.4 Tectonic problems in the Alpine units 109
6. Vepor Unit 112
7. The NE-Hungarian Mountains 114
7.1 Stratigraphy in the Bükk Unit 114
7.1.1 Palaeozoic 114
7.1.1.1 Szendro Hills 116
7.1.1.2 Uppony Range 118

7.1.1.3 Palaeozoic of the Bükk Mountain 122
7.1.2 Mesozoic of the Bükk Mountain 129
7.1.2.1 Triassic of the Parautochthonous 129
7.1.2.2 Triassic of the Kisfennsík Nappe 134
7.1.2.3 Jurassic of the Bükk Mountain 134
7.1.2.4 Senonian in the Uppony Range 136
7.2 Stratigraphy in der Rudabánya Range and Aggtelek Karst 137
7.2.1 Summary of the stratigraphic sequence 138
7.2.2 Detailed remarks on the formations 140
7.2.3 Palaeogeographical reconstructions 150
7.3 Tectonics in the Bükk-Gemerides realm 156
7.3.1 General considerations 156
7.3.2 Nappe stacking in the Bükk Mtn. and Southern Gemerides 160
7.3.3 Interior tectonics of the NE-Hungarian mountain units 166
7.3.4 Tertiary tectonic movements 168
8. Tisia (Tisza) Unit 170
8.1 Stratigraphy 170
8.1.1 Polymetamorphic Crystalline Complex 171
8.1.2 Békés Unit 178
8.1.3 Mecsek Unit 181
8.1.3.1 Palaeozoic 183
8.1.3.2 Mesozoic 186
8.1.3.3 Sequences in the Great Plain basement 199

8.1.4 Villány Unit 199
8.1.4.1 Villány Range 200
8.1.4.2 Great Plain 204
8.1.5 Zemplén Unit 206
8.1.6 The Flysch Trough 207
8.2 Palaeogeographical relationships of Tisia 209
8.3 Tectonics of Tisia 214
8.3.1 Pre-Alpine metamorphism and tectonics 214
8.3.2 Alpidic metamorphism and tectonics 215
8.3.2.1 Mecsek Mountain 216
8.3.2.2 Villány Range 221
8.3.2.3 The Tisia microplate in the basement of the Great Plain 221
8.3.3 Metamorphism in the Zemplén Unit 223
9. The Cenozoic in Hungary 224
9.1 Stratigraphy of the Tertiary 224
9.1.1 Palaeogene 225
9.1.1.1 The Eocene of Transdanubicum 226
9.1.1.1.1 Bakony and Vértes Mountains and Zala Basin 226
9.1.1.1.2 NE-Transdanubia 232
9.1.1.1.3 Fauna and flora of the Eocene 237
9.1.1.2 Oligocene sequences 241
9.1.2 Neogene 249
9.1.2.1 The pre-Pannonian Miocene 252
9.1.2.1.1 Eggenburgian 252
9.1.2.1.2 Ottnangian 256
9.1.2.1.3 Karpatian 256
9.1.2.1.4 Badenian 260
9.1.2.1.5 Sarmatian 264
9.1.2.2 Pannonian 267
9.1.2.2.1 Great Hungarian Plain 270
9.1.2.2.2 Transdanubian Basins 275
9.1.2.2.3 Peripherial and intramontane basins 276
9.1.2.2.4 Fauna and flora of the Pannonian 279
9.2 The Quaternary 283
9.2.1 Great Hungarian Plain 286
9.2.2 Little Hungarian Plain 295
9.2.3 Western and Southern Transdanubia 296
9.2.4 The Lake Balaton 296
9.2.5 Quaternary sediments in the mountains and along their fringes 297
9.2.6 Fauna and flora of the Quaternary 303
10. Tectonics of the basin areas 310
10.1 Palaeogene basins 310
10.2 Neogene basins 312
11. Magmatism 322
11.1 Events prior to the Variscan Orogeny 322
11.2 Acidic plutonism and volcanism of the Variscan cycle 323
11.3 Basic-intermediate volcanism during the Triassic 323
11.4 Ophiolitic magmatites in NE-Hungary 324
11.5 Basic-alkaline volcanism onTisia during the Cretaceous 327
11.6 Cretaceous subvolcanic rocks in the TMM 328
11.7 The ophiolitic suites of the Alpine Unit 328
11.8 The andesite volcanism of the Eocene 329
11.9 The acidic-intermediate volcanism of the Miocene 330
11.9.1 Course of events and genesis of the magma 330
11.9.2 The individual members of the volcanic mountain chain 333
11.10 The basalt-volcanism of the Pannonian 340
12. General outline of tectonic events and palinspastic reconstructions 344
12.1 Summary of the course of tectonic events 344
12.1.1 Pre-Variscan events 344
12.1.2 Variscan events 345
12.1.3 Alpidic development 345
12.2 Geotectonical conceptions 347
12.2.1 Introduction and historical overview 347
12.2.2 The origin of the microplates 350
12.2.3 Palaeomagnetic data and plate rotations 354
12.2.4 Geodynamics of plate movements 357
12.2.5 Extension and subsidence process during the Neogene 370
12.3 Neotectonics and heat flow 375
13 Natural resources 378
13.1 Ores 379
13.1.1 Nonferrous metals 379
13.1.2 Iron-manganese-titanium ores 382
13.1.3 Uranium 383
13.1.4 Bauxite 385
13.2 Sources of energy 391
13.2.1 Crude oil and gas 391
13.2.2 Coal 397
13.2.2.1 Black coal 397
13.2.2.2 Brown coal 398
13.2.3 Geothermal energy and thermal water 401
13.3 Nonmetallic raw materials 404
Literature References 407
Geographical Names 447
Stratigraphical names and major tectonic units and structures 455
Appendix 463