cover

Alfred Schinz:

Cities in China

1989. VIII, 492 pages, 389 figures, 19 tables, 1 map, 21x28cm, 1650 g
Language: English

(Urbanization of the Earth, Volume 7)

ISBN 978-3-443-37009-1, bound, price: 95.00 €

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Keywords

UrbanisierungChinaStadt

Contents

Synopsis top ↑

The author’s interest in Chinese urban planning started forty years ago in the Institute of Urbanism in Berlin under the direction of Hans Scharoun. Twenty years later he went to work as an UN planning adviser in several countries in Asia. In this occupation he spent about twelve years. In the succeeding period he travelled widely through all countries of East Asia, visiting almost all places within the traditional distribution area of the Chinese emigrants in the Pacific Region outside Mainland China guided by his professional interest. In the last decade he had the opportunity to travel through all the provinces of Inner China and to visit various places in Outer China thereby collecting maps, statistics, photo- graphs and other source material, and having discussions on Chinese urban development problems with the city planners in the respective cities. He was supported in these activities by his colleagues of the Tongji University Shanghai.

In recent years, the flow of information about Chinese cities has substantially increased. Several urban studies relating mainly to the larger Chinese cities were published by Western geographers and were of great help for this book. However, a book of this scope and con- cept has not been published in any language before.

Studies of Chinese urbanism face the dilemma of an enormous number of urban settlements and the long history of many of these places. They changed with time in size, form, function, location and even had different names in succeeding periods. The book contains beside graphs, photographs, and tables a considerable amount of maps, designed and drawn especially for this volume. They are presented in one graphic style to make them comparable with each other and have only two scales: 1:50 000, showing the old walled cities, and 1 : 100000, for the cities of today. A fine coloured map "China 1987", showing cities with more than 400000 urban inhabitants, based on the Generalized Land Use Map of China (including Hong Kong and Taiwan) by Wu Chuan Yun et al. and on the Census of 1982, prepared by A. Schinz, is included.

The book is thought to help foreigners as well as Chinese to understand the urban development process within the general frame of its geographical and historical background and in comparison to world urbanism. It will be of interest to geographers as well as urban planners and to the generally in China interested reader who wants to understand the Chinese development process not just only on a day to day basis.

Of interest to: geographers, especially in the field of population and settlement geography, agricultural and economic geography, transportation geography and historical geography; ethnographers, linguists, travel and transportation specialists, politicians, specialists in economic policy, cartographers, historians and their institutions, scientific libraries.

Contents top ↑

Preface V
1.0 General Survey 1
1.1 China in the Traditional Chinese World
Concept 1
1.2 World Urbanization in the Main Areas 3
1.3 Overpopulation and Population Increase 6
2.0 Time and Space 9
2.1 Urban History and the Urbanization Process 9
2.1.1 Periodization 9
2.1.2 Early Urbanism (1700-220 BC) 12
2.1.3 The Chinese Empire in Antiquity (220BC-800 AD)
Imperial Court Culture and Administration 13
2.1.4 The Chinese Empire in the Medieval Era (800- 1400)
Development of Commerce and Urban
Culture 15
2.1.5 The Chinese Empire in Early Modern Times (1400- 1910)
Consolidation and Decay 17
Modern China (<1840>,1910- today ) 20
2.1.6.1 First Part: The Republic of China
Five Phases of Urban Development 21
2.1.6.2 Second Part: The People's Republic of China
Three Phases of Urban Development 23
2.1.7 Conclusion of the Historical Survey and
Outlook 39
2.2 Geographical Characteristics of the Main
Divisions of China 43
2.2.1 Regionalization (Inner and Outer China) 43
2.2.2 The Northern Zone of Inner China 46
2.2.3 The Central Zone of Inner China 51
2.2.4 The Southern Zone of Inner China 59
3.0 Economic Regions and their Cities and
Towns 67
3.1 Concepts of Economic Regions and Urban
Networks 67
3.2 Urban Structure of the Eight Economic
Regions of Inner China 73
3.2.1 The North-Region of Inner China 73
- Beijing - Tianjin 76
- Kaifeng - Zhengzhou 84
- Zhengding - Shijiazhuang 87
- Xingtai 88
- Baoding 89
- Handan 89
- Anyang 90
- Dining 95
- Minding 99
- Cangzkou 100
- Jinan 102
- Yidu 104
- Weifang 105
- Luohe - Yancheng 108
- Zhoukou (Zhoujiakou) - Shangshui 108
- Tai'an - Oufu 112
- Shanhaiguan (Linyu) - Qinhuangdao -
Beidahe 114
- Zhangjiakou - Xuanhua - Zibo 117
- Tangshan 118
- Qingdao 120
- Penglai - Weihai - Yantai 125
- Luoyang 126
- Chengde 131
3.2.2 The Northwest-Region of Inner China 131
- Xi'an 135
- Taiyuan 137
- Lanzhou 148
- Datong 154
- Yinchuan 157
- Yumen 160
- Yuncheng 161
- Yangquan 161
- Changzhi 161
- Tongchuan 161
- Yan'an 161
- Baoji - Tianshui 162
- Jiuquan - Dunhuang 163
- Jiayuguan 163
3.2.3 The Lower Jiang-Region of Inner China 164
- Shanghai -Jinshan- Baoshan- Minhang 167
- Nanjing 190
- Suzhou 192
- Hangzhou 202
- Yangzhou 208
- Shaoxing 214
- Ningbo 217
- Wenzhou 222
- Wuxi 223
- Changzhou 225
- Zhenjiang 230
- Nantong 230
- Qingjiang (Huaiyin) - Huai'an 233
- Xuzhou 233
Lianyunggang 234
-- Hefei 234
- Anqing - WuLu 236
- Bengbu 236
- Huainan - Huaibei 237
- Ma'anshan 237
- Fengyang 240
3.2.4 The Middle Jiang-Region of Inner China 241
- Wuhan (Wuchang) 244
- Changsha 252
- Xiangtan - Zhuzhou 256
- Nanchang 258
- Pingxiang 261
- Jiujiang 261
- Jingdezhen 263
- Jingzbou Jiangling) - Shashi 266
- Yichang - Gezbouba 268
- Danjiangkou 269
- Xiangfan 270
3.2.5 The Upper Jiang-Region of Inner China 270
- Chengdu 272
- Guanxian 279
- Xindu 280
- Leshan 280
- Zigong 281
- Chongqing 282
- Jiangbei 283
3.2.6 The Southwest-Region of Inner China 288
- Kunming 291
- Guiyang 297
- Zhaotong - Zunyi - Maotai -Anshun 299
- Tengchong 299
- Mengzi - Gejiu - Kaiyuan 299
- Dongchuan 300
- Liupanshui 300
- Duyun 300
- Xiaguan - Dali 300
- Luliang 302
3.2.7 The South-Region of Inner China and
Hongkong 303
- Guangzkou 305
- Hongkong 316
- Shenzhen 337
- Zhuhai 338
- Macao 338
- Chaozkou - Shantou 341
- Zhanjiang 343
- Shaoguan 343
- Foshan 344
- Nanxiong 344
- Xinhui - Jiangmen 345
- Qiongshan - Haikou 346
- Guilin 348
- Liuzbou - Nanning 350
- Wuzhou 352
- Beihai 352
3.2.8 The East-Region of Inner China and Taiwan 352
- Fuzhou 353
- Xiamen 358
- Quanzhou 361
- Zhangzhou 366
- Nanping 367
- Longyan- Sanming 368
- Tainan (Tainan) 378
- Kaohsiung (Gaoxiong) 381
- Taipei (Taibei) 382
- Keelung Uilong) 387
- Changhua-Lukang (Zhanghua- Lugang) 390
- Taichung-Chunghsing (Taizbong -
Zhongxing) 390
-Hualien-Taitung (Hualian-Taidong) 403
- Penghu - Makung (Penghu-Magong) 403
3.3 The Urban Structure of Outer China 405
3.3.1 The Northeast - The three Provinces of
Manchuria 405
- Shenyang 411
- Fushun, Benxi, Liaoyang, Anshan, Fuxin,
Dandong, Luda, YingLuo 421
- Kaiyuan 422
- Dalian 424
- Changchun - Jilin 427
- Qiqihar 433
- Harbin 434
- Daqing 438
3.3.2 The Steppes and Oases of Outer China,
Inner Mongolia and Xinjiang 438
- Turpan 440
- Kashi (Kashgar) 442
-Shache (Yarkant) 444
-Hotan (Khotan) 444
- Yutian - Minfeng 445
-Aksu 446
-Hami 449
- Urumqi 449
- Karamay - ShiLezi 452
- Yining 454
- Inner Mongolia 455
- Hohhot 458
- Baotou 461
- Linhe 463
- Mongol headquarters of leagues 465
3.3.3 The High Plateau of Outer China, Qinghai
and Tibet 465
-Xinig 467
- Qaidam basin 470
- Lamaseries 470
- Lhasa 474
- Xigaze 478
Review of Source Material 482
Register 485