cover

Jens Götze; Winfried Zimmerle:

Quartz and silica as guide to provenance in sediments and sedimentary rocks

2000. IV, 91 pages, 52 figures, 20 tables, 6 plates, 21x28cm, 350 g
Language: English

(Contributions to Sedimentary Geology, Volume 21)

ISBN 978-3-510-57021-8, paperback, price: 39.00 €

in stock and ready to ship

Order form

BibTeX file

Keywords

quartzsedimentrockgrainsurfacemagneticQuartzSedimentFelsKornOberflächemagnetisch

Contents

Content Description top ↑

Quartz is the most abundant and widespread detrial mineral in sedimentary rocks due to its wide occurrence in crystalline source rocks and to its relative resistance during transport and sedimentation. It occurs as a detrial component in conglomerates, sandstones and other siliciclastic rocks. In the present contribution quartz is considered as a guide to provenance analysis in sedimentary basins but also for provenance evaluation of other geological, archeological and industrial materials. In order to reconstruct the provenance of quartz various properties and parameters are commonly in use: colour, shape, internal structure, type of inclusions, geochemical parameters and cathodoluminescence. The analytical methods used can differ in preparation procedures, equipments used, time of analysis, etc. resulting in a wide spectrum of methods.

Contents top ↑


Abstract IV
Acknowledgements IV
1. Introduction 1
2. Mineralogical data 3
2.1 Modifications of silica (SiO2) 3
2.2 The ideal structure of quartz 3
2.3 The real structure of quartz 6
2.3.1 Point defects 6
2.3.2 Dislocations 7
2.3i3 Coherent scattering lattice domains 7
2.3.4 Microinclusions of minerals and fluids 9
3. Methods for evaluating the provenance of quartz 10
3.1 Primaryshape 12
3.2 Secondary shape 13
3.3 Quartz grain surface features 16
3.4 Twinning 20
3.5 Deformation features and internal structures 21
3.6 Inclusion studies (co-authored by T. Graupner) 29
3.6.1 Mineral inclusions 29
3.6.2 Gas and fluid inclusions 34
3.7 Isotope composition 40
3.7.1 Silicon isotope composition 40
3.7.2 Oxygen isotope composition 42
3.7.3 Lead isotope composition 46
3.8 Trace elements 46
3.9 Electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) (co-authored by M. Plotze) 53
3.10 Luminescence 57
3.10.1 Radioluminescence 58
3.10.2 Thermoluminescence 58
3.10.3 Cathodoluminescence 62
3.11 Irradiation colour 70
3.12 Other methods (quartz colour, density) 73
4. Conclusions 77
5. References 79