cover

Eberhard Machens:

Platinum, gold and diamonds

The adventure of Hans Merensky's discoveries

2009. 308 pages, 4 figures, 15x22cm, 550 g
Language: English

ISBN 978-3-510-65257-0, paperback, price: 26.80 €

in stock and ready to ship

Order form

BibTeX file

Keywords

platinumgolddiamonddepositsouth africadiscoverymerenskymerensky reefbushveld complexnamibia biography

Contents

Synopsis top ↑

Platinum, gold and diamonds recounts the captivating story of the life of Hans Merensky, responsible for discovering the richest platinum deposit worldwide in South Africa. Born the son of a well known missionary at Botshabelo (Transvaal), Merensky was trained as a geologist in Germany and drawn back to South Africa by his creative ambition to explore the potential of his native country. On close scrutiny Hans Merensky (*March 16, 1871 to †October 21, 1952) was far more than the wizard geologist the press dubbed him during his heyday.

Today it is obvious that Merensky was not only a scientist of note, but also an extremely farsighted and thoughtful economic strategist, agricultural trendsetter, humanitarian and philanthropist. Nothing could extinguish his enthusiasm for his adopted homeland’s undiscovered treasures and despite bankruptcy, internment, illness, political obstacles and later, old age, Hans Merensky saw only opportunity wherever he went. From the discovery of the Merensky-Reef (the richest platinum deposit world wide) and the richest deposits of alluvial gem diamonds ever found to the initial attempts at the commercial cultivation of avocados and the controlled planting of saligna (Eucalyptus) and pine trees—almost everything Hans Merensky touched turned to gold (platin, rather).

The book however, does not stop at merely portraying Merensky's life and achievements. Text boxes throughout the text provide background information about ore geology and economic geology, mineral markets and supporting data to enable the reader to understand the implications of Merensky's achievements.

About the author:
As a budding geologist Eberhard W. Machens (*1929) worked in Africa for ten years, prospecting for various ores, particularly for gold. After returning to his native Germany he submitted a postdoctoral thesis on the ore deposits of the african basement complex, and took up a professorship for geology of non-European countries at the University of Mainz. Later he was a director at OECD in Paris, responsible for mining and prospecting issues in developing countries. Subsequently he was with the Federal Ministry of Economic Affairs in Bonn for 14 years, responsible for raw material issues in International economic relations, before rounding off his career with a professorship in raw materials economics at the University of Cottbus.
Platinum, gold and diamonds was inspired by the author’s intimate knowledge of the international interconnectedness between raw material markets, of prospecting methods and of the life of a prospector in the African bush.

A german-language edition of this title is also available

Review: South African Journal of Science vol. 105 no. 11-12 top ↑

A tale of an extraordinary prospector

Hans Merensky, who lived from 1871 to 1952, is a legend to anyone involved in mineral exploration in southern Africa. His contributions to the development of world-class mines in the Bushveld (platinum group metals and chrome ore); on the southern African west coast for diamonds; and the Phalaborwa carbonatite are well recognised. That he had other less spectacular but important successes, such as a role in developing the Free State goldfields near Odendaalsrus, is one of the many interesting facts that emerge from this entertaining and inspiring biography.

Born in SouthAfrica, where his German parents were missionaries, he relocated with his family to Berlin at the age of 11, only to return to South Africa as a fully trained geologist and mining engineer in 1904 at the age of 33. A number of years operating as a successful consultant were brought to a temporary halt by a bankruptcy during a global recession, followed by the further misfortune of being interned at Fort Napier in Pietermaritzburg for the duration of WorldWar I. Consequently when Merensky re-established himself in Johannesburg in 1919 he was 48 years old and starting from scratch. All his major exploration successes were still ahead of him: platinum in the Bushveld (1924); diamonds in Namaqualand (1926); gold in the Free State (1936); chrome in the Bushveld and vermiculite and apatite at Phalaborwa took longer to develop, starting from 1937 but interrupted by World War 2.

This prospecting success record is truly staggering, and is unquestionably unmatched in southern Africa, and to my knowledge anywhere else. This account of his achievements is fascinating. Yet chapter 15, titled ‘The turning point in Merensky’s life’, doesn’t deal with his exploration successes, other than to mention that they allowed Merensky to finally pay back all his debts and to purchase the farm Westfalia that was to provide the principle focus for the rest of his life.

In all above instances Merensky not only led the exploration initiatives, he fulfilled the entrepreneurial role of raising the high-risk, early-stage funding and the placing of the projects in the hands of appropriate developers. So it was entirely fitting that the last coup of Merensky’s exploration initiatives was to prospect Phalaborwa, and in doing so provide the South African government of the day—and the local agricultural community— with the future Phosphate Development Corporation.

I found the biography fascinating for a host of reasons. The early days of Merensky’s life, it would appear, gave him an identity with open spaces and independence. His powers of observation, meticulous record keeping, outstanding memory and discipline were also clearly key attributes in an age when an earth scientist could venture into the field with only simple prospecting aids, and yet have a realistic hope for success. I use the term ‘earth scientist’ advisedly, as Merensky was trained as both a geologist and a mining engineer, and his projects in later life included ones involving agricultural research and development.

His endeavours have led to an equally impressive legacy that he was able to mastermind himself: the Hans Merensky Foundation today has over 4 000 employees, offering global research services on agricultural matters and sponsoring student fellowships. It is all told a record of a remarkable life, involving trials and tribulations but in the end triumphant over adversity. Furthermore it is clear that Merensky, while at ease with himself, was able to bring out the best in others—an essential factor in the style in which he operated. This is reflected in the manner in which his wishes have been followed since his death nearly 60 years ago.

Text boxes throughout the book provide useful insight for readers needing to know some background to Merensky’s life and achievements. These make a significant contribution to the enjoyment of the tale, which it should be emphasised has been admirably translated from the original German by Idette Noomé, and edited by Amelia de Vaal. All in all this is a highly recommended read for everyone, not just for earth scientists.

Personally I found this book to be a thought-provoking life record. If the rest of us were one tenth as effective, South Africa and the world would be a much better place to live in. This biography will give plenty of pleasure in the reading, but more importantly it deserves to inspire readers who are in a position to make a difference in their field of endeavours. It isn’t (probably) possible to emulate Merensky. There is only one Bushveld Igneous Complex, one Wits Basin, one stretch of over 1 000 km of coast with diamonds scattered all over it, and one Phalaborwa. The best one could expect would be to follow in his footsteps. Truly he has a unique record.

John Gurney, Mineral Services, South Africa

South African Journal of Science vol. 105 no. 11-12 Pretoria Nov./Dec. 2009

Rezension: World of Mining - Surface & Underground 2/2010 top ↑

Das jetzt in englischer Sprache vorgelegte Buch ist nicht nur in geologischer und lagerstättenkundlicher Hinsicht von weitreichendem Interesse, sondern auch wegen seiner lebendigen Darstellung eines Mannes, der ein Leben voller Höhen und Tiefen durchlebt hat. Das Buch erzählt aufregende Abenteuer und dokumentiert zugleich ein Stück internationaler Industriegeschichte. Hans Merensky personifiziert für Südafrika in mehrfacher Hinsicht eine der prägenden Gestalten der ersten Hälfte des vergangenen Jahrhunderts. Er war der erfolgreichste Entdecker von Erz- und Edelsteinlagerstätten, den es weltweit je gegeben hat. Südafrika und auch Namibia haben von seinen Entdeckungen sehr profitiert. Merensky starb 1952, 81-jährig, auf einer seiner vorbildhaft geführten Farmen in Transvaal als reicher Mann, Industrieller und engagierter Mäzen. Durch sein wegweisendes Testament wirkt er bis heute für die Menschen im Lande am Kap der Guten Hoffnung.

Im Einzelnen beschreibt Machens die Jugend- und Ausbildungszeit, die Hans als Sohn des deutschen Missionars Alexander Merensky in Transvaal erlebte und die er als Geologie- und Bergbaustudent in Breslau und Berlin sehr erfolgreich fortsetzte. Spannend wie ein Kriminalroman liest sich die Beschreibung der Zeit Merenskys als Beratender Geologe und Bergingenieur in Johannesburg, wo er während der „Goldgräberphase“ für Farmer, Großindustrielle und Banken tätig war. So schnell das Geld damals hereinkam, so schnell verlor Merensky sein bereits beachtliches Vermögen bald darauf durch einen Börsenkrach. Seine kurz danach mit Ausbruch des 1. Weltkrieges erfolgte Internierung hat ihm physisch und psychisch stark zugesetzt. Erst mehrere Jahre danach folgten seine großen Entdeckungen der Lagerstätten von Weltrang: Platin (Merensky Reef), Diamanten an der Atlantikküste südlich des heutigen Namibia, Gold (Oranje-Freistaat) und Chromerze im nördlichen Transvaal.

Noch als 75-jähriger Mann entdeckte er nach Beendigung des 2. Weltkrieges die große Phosphatlagerstätte Phalaborwa im Nordosten Transvaals. Ihre Erzvorräte reichen aus, Südafrikas Bedarf an Rohphosphat für hundert Jahre zu decken. Diesen bedeutenden Prospektionserfolg, der einen gigantischen Lagerstättenwert darstellt und aus eigenem Vermögen finanziert wurde, erklärte Merensky zu seinem „Abschiedsgeschenk“ an alle Südafrikaner.

Abschließend würdigt der Verfasser zunächst mit großem Respekt das Lebenswerk Merenskys in Hinblick auf die seinen Namen tragende Stiftung und die daraus hervor gegangenen sozialen Impulse und Einflüsse. Im Anschluss daran erörtert er die nachhaltige, weltweite Bedeutung der von ihm entdeckten Großlagerstätten.

Besondere Erwähnung verdienen zwölf eingestreute „Textboxes“, in denen der Verfasser Randthemen abhandelt, deren Kenntnis für das Verständnis einzelner Situationen im Leben Hans Merenskys hilfreich ist. Dazu gehören die Genese einzelner Lagerstätten, Erläuterungen der Prospektionsmethoden, die Geschichte des Platins und der Diamanten, die Bedeutung des Eukalyptus als Nutzholz, aber auch weiterab gelegene Themen wie das biblische Goldland Ophir oder die erstaunlichen Parallelen zwischen dem Leben von Hans Merensky und einigen der Goldgräbergeschichten von Jack London. Obwohl knapp gehalten, sind diese Beschreibungen sehr instruktiv. Der Verfasser erweist sich dabei als erfahrener und praxisorientierter Kenner des afrikanischen Kontinents, auf dem er selbst ein Jahrzehnt lang prospektiert hat. Zugleich sorgt die Herauslösung und separate Präsentation der Textboxes dafür, dass die eigentliche Lebensbeschreibung leicht und zügig lesbar ist.

Ergänzt wird das Buch durch ausführliche Literaturhinweise, ein Personenregister, ein Ortsverzeichnis und ein umfassendes Sachverzeichnis. Gut gewählte Abbildungen und Übersichtskarten runden das Werk ab. Es bleibt sehr zu hoffen, dass diese lesenswerte Biographie bald auch in deutscher Sprache erscheinen möge und dann vielen jungen Geologen und Bergleuten zur Lektüre an die Hand gegeben wird.

Assessor des Bergfaches Gerhard Florin

World of Mining - Surfaces & Underground 2/2010, p. 128

Bespr.: GMIT Nr. 41 (September 2010) top ↑

„Platinum. Gold and Diamonds" behandelt das Leben und Wirken des wohl bedeutendsten Prospektionsgeologen des letzten Jahrhunderts, Hans Merensky. 1871 als Sohn eines brandenburgischen Missionars In Südafrika geboren, studiert Hans Merensky Geologie und Bergbau in Berlin und Breslau und kehrt 1904, 33-jährig, nach Südafrika zurück. Nach einigen erfolgreichen Jahren als selbständiger Beratender Geologe muss er sich während eines Börsencrashs für bankrott erklären, während des 1. Weltkriegs wird er interniert und muss 1919, 48-jährig, wieder bei Null beginnen. Danach geht es steil bergauf, 1924 gelingt ihm die Entdeckung der weltweit bedeutendsten Platinvorkommens im Bushveld Komplex (Merensky Reef). Hans Merensky wird zum reichen Mann und kann alle Schulden und Verbindlichkeiten zurückzahlen. Durch unglückliche Umstände gerät er allerdings schon bald wieder an den Rand des Ruins. Da gelingt ihm ein weiterer Coup. Er entdeckt in Namaqualand die Austernlinie", eine der reichsten Diamanten-Lagerstätten der Welt und wird so endgültig zu einem dar wohlhabendsten Männer Südafrikas. Damit aber noch nicht genug: 1936 leistet er einen bedeutenden Anteil an der Entdeckung der Goldvorkommen im Free State und entdeckt kurz darauf die bedeutenden Chromitlagerstätten des Bushvoldt. 1937 folgt die Entdeckung der Vermiculit- und 1946 schließlich die der überaus reichen Phosphatvorkommen in Palabora. Neben seiner Prospektorentätigkeit beschäftigt sich Merensky vor allem in seinen letzten Lebensjahren intensiv mit Forschungen zum Ökologischen Landbau auf seiner Farm Westfalia in Transvaal. Seit seinem Tode im Jahr 1952 verwaltet die Merensky Foundation seine bedeutende Hinterlassenschaft.

Das Leben Hans Merenskys ist eine Geschichte voller Aufs und Abs, wie sie extremer nicht sein könnten. „Platin, Gold and Diamonds" ist nicht nur eine Biographie für geowissenschaftlich Interessierte, sondern zugleich ein spannendes Abenteuerbuch. Der Autor versteht es, dem Leser die Person Merenskys durch viele Anekdoten und Geschichten aus seiner Jugend und seinem sozialen Umfeld näherzubringen. Durch separate Erläuterungen und Einschübe zu geowissenschaftlirhen Fachthemen ist das Buch auch für Nicht-Geologen leicht verständlich. „Platinum, Gold and Diamonds" ist ein äußerst lesenswertes Buch, das hoffentlich demnächst auch in deutscher Sprache erscheinen wird.

Rainer Herd, Cottbus

GMIT • NR. 41 • SEPTEMBER 2010

Bespr.: der Aufschluss Ausgabe 1, Januar/Februar 2011 top ↑

Das Buch beschreibt eindrucksvoll, beginnend mit den Eltern von Hans MERENSKY, das Leben und die Entwicklung eines der großen geologischen Entdecker, der als Deutscher geboren, auch im Ausland (Südafrika) während des 1. Weltkriegs, seiner Abstam - mung wegen interniert wurde. Eingestreut zwischen die Geschichte, finden sich immer wieder Erläuterungen zur Geologie, wie zum Beispiel von primä ren und sekundären Lagerstätten, die Geschichte der Diamanten, des Platins, des Vermiculits.

Beginnend mit einer Beschreibung von angeblichen Goldlagerstätten in Madagaskar, die durch sogenannte salted samples (künstlich angereicherte Proben) geschaffen wurden, konnte H. MERENSKY den „Irrtum“ mit aufklären helfen. Dann kommt es mit der Beschreibung der Details, die zum Auffinden der weltweit größten Platinlagerstätten und der noch existierenden Vorräte führten (jeder kennt das Merensky- Reef), dem wohl bekanntesten Lagerstättentyp, zu einem Höhepunkt im Buchteil. Auch der erworbene Reichtum und der vor allem durch die Rezession dann folgende Gesamtverlust dieser hohen Summen stellen das Auf- und Ab im Leben des H. MERENSKY hervorragend dar. Dass H. MERENSKY aber auch massgeblich an den Funden der Namaqualand-Diamanten, der Chromitlagerstätten, des Goldes im Orange Freistaat, aber auch der Beitrag zu den Apatit, Vermiculit, Kupfervorkommen von Phalabora müssen mit angeführt werden. Stets wird deutlich, dass H. MERENSKY nicht nur durch genaue Beobachtung des geologischen Sachverhaltes, sondern dann auch durch den eigenen Antrieb immer erst zufrieden war, wenn es zu einer wirtschaftlichen Nutzung seiner Funde kam. Die Funde und die Rechte an den Diamanten haben ihn schließlich wieder zu einem reichen Mann gemacht, der in seinen älteren Jahren auch das Farmergewerbe pflegte. Den 2ten Weltkrieg erlebte er, gerade nicht ein 2tes Mal interniert, aber doch unter Hausarrest auf seiner Farm Westfalia.

Das 308 Seiten starke Buch liest sich flüssig und gibt durch die eingestreuten Geschichten den notwendigen Hintergrund, um diesen großen Geologen besser zu verstehen. Auch das Auf- und Ab zwischen dem ersten verdienten Geld durch geologische Beratung bis hin zu einem reichen Mann, der totalen Verarmung bis hin zu einem erneuten märchenhaften Reichtum, basierend auf seinen geologischen aber auch wirtschaftlichen Erfolgen, die bei näherem Hinsehen sich aber mehr auf den technischen Bereich erstreckten, als sie für das tägliche Leben oft tauglich waren. Eingebunden sind auch einige informative s/w- Abbildungen von geologischen Strukturen, Kollegen, ihm selbst, aber auch von Kartenmaterial und typischen Aktien der damaligen Zeit.

Dieses Buch schafft Wissen und macht die Geologie und Entdeckung von Mineralen echt lebensnah.

Das Buch kann als Roman gelesen werden, aber vermittelt auch sehr viel Wissenswertes, nicht nur um die Hauptperson, sondern auch zu Zeit und Landschaft. Es schafft auch ein Gefühl, die Gedankengänge und die Liebe zum Beruf gut nachvollziehen zu können. Ich habe das Buch auf zwei langen Flügen komplett gelesen, und konnte die Zeit zwischen Hin- und Rückflug kaum erwarten, um auch das Buch komplett fertigzulesen. Dies verdeutlicht, dass der Autor es geschafft hat, den Inhalt so aufzubereiten, dass es ein gelungenes Werk geworden ist. Eine gelungene Mischung – jeder der englisch lesen kann und sich für Geologie interessiert, sollte es haben.

Herbert PÖLLMANN, Halle (Saale)

der Aufschluss Ausgabe 1, Januar/Februar 2011, Seite 25-26

Bespr.: Der Anschnitt 63, 2011, H. 1 top ↑

Der Verfasser schildert in packender und fachlich fundierter Weise die Entdeckung der großen Lagerstätten von Platin und Chrom sowie von Gold und Diamanten im südlichen Afrika durch den in Deutschland ausgebildeten Geologen und Bergmann Hans Merensky in der ersten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts. Das jetzt in englischer Sprache vorgelegte Buch ist nicht nur in geologischer und lagerstättenkundlicher Hinsicht von weit reichendem Interesse, sondern auch wegen seiner lebendigen Darstellung eines Mannes, der ein Leben voller Höhen und Tiefen durchlebt hat. Das Buch erzählt aufregende Abenteuer und dokumentiert zugleich ein Stück Industriegeschichte.

Hans Merensky personifiziert für Südafrika in mehrfacher Hinsicht eine der prägenden Gestalten der ersten Hälfte des 20. Jahrhunderts. Er war der erfolgreichste Entdecker von Erz- und Edelsteinlagerstätten, den es weltweit je gegeben hat. Südafrika und auch Namibia haben von seinen Entdeckungen sehr profitiert. Merensky starb 1952, 81-jährig, auf einer seiner vorbildhaft geführten Farmen in Transvaal als reicher Mann, Industrieller und engagierter Mäzen. Durch sein wegweisendes Testament und eine Stiftung wirkt er bis heute für die Menschen im Land am Kap der Guten Hoffnung.

Im einzelnen beschreibt Machens die Jugendund Ausbildungszeit, die er als Sohn des deutschen Missionars Alexander Merensky zunächst in Transvaal erlebte und die er als Geologie- und Bergbaustudent in Breslau und Berlin erfolgreich abschloss. Während seiner Militärzeit in Preußen, die dem Studium vorausging, wurde ihm zunehmend deutlich, dass sein zukünftiger Beruf der eines Geologen und Bergmanns sein sollte. Er versprach sich davon die größtmögliche persönliche Unabhängigkeit. Tatsächlich hat sich Merensky in seinem späteren Berufsleben nie in eine abhängige Stellung begeben. Er hat sein Leben lang als Selbstständiger eigenverantwortlich gearbeitet, sei es als Geologe und Bergingenieur oder später als Farmer und Unternehmer.

Nach Abschluss seiner Referendarzeit und der Ernennung zum Königlich Preußischen Bergassessor ließ Merensky sich „vorübergehend“ aus dem Staatsdienst beurlauben mit der Begründung, einen Bericht über die Grubentätigkeiten in Südafrika erstellen zu wollen. Spannend wie ein Kriminalroman liest sich die Schilderung der Zeit Merenskys ab 1904 als „Beratender Geologe und Bergingenieur“ in Johannesburg, wo er während der „Goldgräberphase“ gleichermaßen für Farmer, Industrielle und Banken tätig war. Schon bald gelangte er zu Ruhm und Ansehen in der Fachwelt, als er seinen Auftraggeber, die Rothschildgruppe, rechtzeitig von einer kostspieligen Fehlinvestition abhielt. Nach Begutachtung eines hoch gepriesenen Goldvorkommens in Madagaskar warnte er vor dem Erwerb der Abbaurechte, indem er seine Einschätzung des Vorkommens telegraphisch mit dem Einsilber „Faul“ übermittelte. Wenig später bekräftigte er seine Beurteilung durch ein weiteres Telegramm mit dem Wortlaut „Oberfaul“. Innerhalb weniger Tage stürzten die Madagaskar-Papiere ins Bodenlose und verschwanden dann für immer vom Johannesburger Börsenzettel.

So schnell das Geld damals hereinkam, so schnell verlor Merensky sein bereits beachtliches Vermögen bald darauf durch einen Börsenkrach. Seine kurz danach mit Ausbruch des Ersten Weltkriegs erfolgte Internierung hat ihm physisch und psychisch stark zugesetzt. Erst mehrere Jahre danach folgten seine großen Lagerstättenentdeckungen:

Platin (Merensky Reef). Dieses Edelmetall kam bis dahin fast ausschließlich aus Russland, und seine Entdeckung in Südafrika verschaffte Merensky schlagartig Weltruhm.

Diamanten an der Atlantikküste, südlich des heutigen Namibia. Es war das an Steinen mit Schmucksteinqualität weltweit reichste Diamantenlager, das je gefunden wurde. Seine Entdeckung machte ihn zum Millionär.

Gold im Oranje-Freistaat. Dieser Fund verhalf dem damals im Niedergang befindlichen südafrikanischen Goldbergbau zu neuer Blüte.

Chromerze im „Bushveld“ (nördliches Transvaal). Diese Lagerstätten beherrschen heute den Weltmarkt und stellen knapp 73 % der heutigen Weltreserven an Chromerzen dar. Noch als 75-jähriger Mann entdeckte er nach Beendigung des Zweiten Weltkriegs die große Phosphatlagerstätte Phalaborwa im Nordosten Transvaals. Ihre Erzvorräte (Apatit) reichen aus, Südafrikas Bedarf an Rohphosphat für hundert Jahre zu decken. Diesen bedeutenden Prospektionserfolg, der einen gigantischen Lagerstättenwert darstellt und den er aus eigenem Vermögen finanziert hatte, übergab Merenky als sein „Abschiedsgeschenk“ an alle Südafrikaner.

Abschließend würdigt der Verfasser mit großem Respekt das Lebenswerk Merenskys im Hinblick auf die seinen Namen tragende Stiftung und die daraus hervorgegangenen sozialen Impulse und Einflüsse. Im Anschluss erörtert er die nachhaltige, weltweite Bedeutung der von ihm entdeckten Großlagerstätten.

Erwähnung verdienen auch zwölf „Textboxes“, in denen der Verfasser Randthemen abhandelt, deren Kenntnis für das Verständnis einzelner Situationen im Leben Hans Merenskys hilfreich ist. Dazu gehören die Genese einzelner Lagerstätten, Erläuterungen der Prospektionsmethoden, die Geschichte des Platins und der Diamanten, die Bedeutung des Eukalyptus als Nutzholz, aber auch weiter ab gelegene Themen, wie das biblische Goldland Ophir oder die erstaunlichen Parallelen zwischen dem Leben von Hans Merensky und einigen der Goldgräbergeschichten von Jack London. Obwohl knapp gehalten, sind diese Beschreibungen sehr instruktiv. Der Verfasser erweist sich dabei als erfahrener und praxisorientierter Kenner des afrikanischen Kontinents, auf dem er selbst ein Jahrzehnt lang prospektiert hat. Zugleich sorgt die Herauslösung und separate Präsentation der „Textboxes“ dafür, dass die eigentliche Lebensbeschreibung Merenskys leicht und zügig lesbar bleibt.

Das Buch wird ergänzt durch ausführliche Literaturhinweise, ein Personenregister, ein Ortsverzeichnis und ein umfassendes Sachverzeichnis. Gut gewählte Abbildungen und Übersichtskarten runden das Werk ab. Insgesamt bleibt sehr zu hoffen, dass diese lesenswerte Biographie bald auch in deutscher Sprache erscheinen möge und dann vielen jungen Geologen und Bergleuten zur Lektüre an die Hand gegeben wird.

Assessor des Bergfachs Gerhard Florin, Bonn

Der Anschnitt 63, 2011 H. 1

Table of Contents top ↑

Preface and acknowledgements 7
Chapter 1: The life of a discoverer 13
Textbox 1: What is a mineral deposit? 15
Chapter 2. The missionary's son 17
Textbox 2: The land of gold - Ophir 25
Textbox 3: Carl Mauch discovers the
Zimbabwe Ruins 28
Chapter 3: Lieutenant of the Guard and mining assessor 33
Chapter 4: Consulting geologist in South Africa 41
Textbox 4: What is the difference between prospecting and exploration? 46
Chapter 5: The Madagascar gold 53
Textbox 5: "Primary" and "secondary" deposits 61
Chapter 6: Bankruptcy 65
Chapter 7: Interned 73
Chapter 8: The art of getting into debt 79
Chapter 9: Light at the end of the tunnel 85
Textbox 6: The history of platinum 90
Chapter 10: Platinum in the Bushveld 97
Chapter 11: Platinum, platinum without end 113
Chapter 12: To the Adlon in Berlin and back to the Transvaal 1
Textbox 7: The history of diamonds 139
Chapter 13: Diamonds in Namaqualand 143
Textbox 8: "Like Argus of the Ancient Times" 161
Chapter 14: The struggle for mining rights 163
Textbox 9: The diamond cartel 179
Chapter 15: The turning point in Merensky's life 183
Chapter 16: A summer in Mecklenburg 189
Chapter 17: The creative farmer 201
Textbox 10: Eucalyptus as timber 217
Chapter 18: Gold in the Orange Free State 219
Textbox 11: Chrome ore deposits 226
Chapter 19: New successes: chrome ores and vermiculite 229
Textbox 12: Vermiculite 237
Chapter 20: The last coup 239
Chapter 21: The last years 253
Chapter 22: A lasting legacy 265
Bibliography 281
Index of people 289
Index of places, companies and institutions 293
Index of concepts and events 301